Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology

Focusing on the day-to-day operations of the U.S. armory at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, from 1798 to 1861, this book shows what the "new technology" of mechanized production meant in terms of organization, management, and worker morale.

Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology

Focusing on the day-to-day operations of the U.S. armory at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, from 1798 to 1861, this book shows what the "new technology" of mechanized production meant in terms of organization, management, and worker morale. A local study of much more than local significance, it highlights the major problems of technical innovation and social adaptation in antebellum America. Merritt Roe Smith describes how positions of authority at the armory were tied to a larger network of political and economic influence in the community; how these relationships, in turn, affected managerial behavior; and how local social conditions reinforced the reactions of decision makers. He also demonstrates how craft traditions and variant attitudes toward work vis-à-vis New England created an atmosphere in which the machine was held suspect and inventive activity was hampered. Of central importance is the author's analysis of the drastic differences between Harpers Ferry and its counterpart, the national armory at Springfield, Massachusetts, which played a pivotal role in the emergence of the new technology. The flow of technical information between the two armories, he shows, moved in one direction only— north to south. "In the end," Smith concludes, "the stamina of local culture is paramount in explaining why the Harpers Ferry armory never really flourished as a center of technological innovation." Pointing up the complexities of industrial change, this account of the Harpers Ferry experience challenges the commonly held view that Americans have always been eagerly receptive to new technological advances.

More Books:

Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Merritt Roe Smith
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-01-26 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

Focusing on the day-to-day operations of the U.S. armory at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, from 1798 to 1861, this book shows what the "new technology" of mechanized production meant in terms of organization, management, and worker morale. A local study of much more than local significance, it highlights the major problems
The Harpers Ferry Armory and the
Language: en
Pages: 1072
Authors: Merritt Roe Smith
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1974 - Publisher:

Books about The Harpers Ferry Armory and the "new Technology" in America, 1794-1854
The Making of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
Language: en
Pages: 235
Authors: Teresa S. Moyer, Paul A. Shackel
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Rowman Altamira

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park is most widely known today for the attempted slave revolt led by John Brown in 1859, the nucleus for the interpretation of the current national park. Here, Teresa S. Moyer and Paul A. Shackel tell the behind-the-scenes story of how this event was chosen and
Harpers Ferry Armory and the New Technology
Language: en
Pages: 364
Authors: Merritt Roe Smith
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-03-19 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

Focusing on the day-to-day operations of the U.S. armory at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, from 1798 to 1861, this book shows what the "new technology" of mechanized production meant in terms of organization, management, and worker morale. A local study of much more than local significance, it highlights the major problems
Archeological Investigation of the Armory Street, Lower Armory Grounds, Harpers Ferry Armory 46JF518
Language: en
Pages: 655
Authors: Darlene Hassler, Justin Ebersole
Categories: Antiques & Collectibles
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016 - Publisher: Government Printing Office

The archeological investigation of the Armory Street within the Lower Armory Grounds provides us with a broader view of both the Native American and early Armory occupation periods and yields further data to better understand the early history and prehistory of Harpers Ferry. A number of interesting artifacts were collected