More Books:

Humanism: A Very Short Introduction
Language: en
Pages: 150
Authors: Stephen Law
Categories: Philosophy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-01-27 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Summary: Philosopher Stephen Law explains why humanism--though a rejection of religion--nevertheless provides both a moral basis and a meaning for our lives.-publisher description.
Secularism
Language: en
Pages: 139
Authors: Andrew Copson
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-07-11 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Secularism, the belief that religion should not be part of the affairs of the state, is an increasingly divisive topic. More than ever before, it is debated and criticized, as secular republics such as India and France face challenges from the resurgence of religious identity politics; while religious states like
Hermeneutics
Language: en
Pages: 159
Authors: Jens Zimmermann
Categories: Hermeneutics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

This Very Short Introduction to hermeneutics demonstrates the central role of interpretation in our daily lives. By considering the historic developments in hermeneutic theory as well as its contemporary relevance, Zimmermann explains how humans continue to draw knowledge from the world around them.
Humanism: A Very Short Introduction
Language: en
Pages: 168
Authors: Stephen Law
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-01-27 - Publisher: OUP Oxford

Religion is currently gaining a much higher profile. The number of faith schools is increasingly, and religious points of view are being aired more frequently in the media. As religion's profile rises, those who reject religion, including humanists, often find themselves misunderstood, and occasionally misrepresented. Stephen Law explores how humanism
Machiavelli
Language: en
Pages: 144
Authors: Quentin Skinner
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Niccolo Machiavelli taught that political leaders must be prepared to do evil so that good may come of it, and his name has been a byword ever since for duplicity and immorality. Is his sinister reputation deserved? In answering this question Quentin Skinner traces the course of Machiavelli's adult life,