More Books:

Tudor Drama and Religious Controversy
Language: en
Pages: 165
Authors: James C. Bryant
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 1984 - Publisher: Mercer University Press

Books about Tudor Drama and Religious Controversy
Jewish and Christian Voices in English Reformation Biblical Drama
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Chanita Goodblatt
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-02-01 - Publisher: Routledge

English Biblical drama of the sixteenth century resounds with a variety of Jewish and Christian voices. Whether embodied as characters or manifested as exegetical and performative strategies, these voices participate in the central Reformation project of biblical translation. Such translations and dramatic texts are certainly enriched by studying them within
Drama and the Sacraments in Sixteenth-Century England
Language: en
Pages: 180
Authors: D. Coleman
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-10-11 - Publisher: Springer

This is the first book-length study of the relationship between early modern drama and sacramental ritual and theology. It examines dramatic forms, such as morality plays. Offering new insights into the religious practices on which early modern subjectivity is founded. Coleman offers radical new ways of reading canonical Renaissance plays.
Theatre and Humanism
Language: en
Pages: 321
Authors: Kent Cartwright
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999-09-09 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

English drama at the beginning of the sixteenth century was allegorical, didactic and moralistic; but by the end of the century theatre was censured as emotional and even immoral. How could such a change occur? Kent Cartwright suggests that some theories of early Renaissance theatre - particularly the theory that
Staging Reform, Reforming the Stage
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Huston Diehl
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-06-07 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

Huston Diehl sees Elizabethan and Jacobean drama as both a product of the Protestant Reformation—a reformed drama—and a producer of Protestant habits of thought—a reforming drama. According to Diehl, the popular London theater, which flourished in the years after Elizabeth reestablished Protestantism in England, rehearsed the religious crises that disrupted,