Zola and the Art of Television

This volume brings translation theory into dialogue with adaptation studies to open new debates. It does so in relation to an author of key import to adaptation studies.

Zola and the Art of Television

Émile Zola (1840-1902) has become one of the most adapted authors of all time, but while much has been made of his adaptation into cinema and theatre, television has largely been overlooked. Yet television, with its serial structures and popular reach, is uniquely suited to the adaptation of a novelist who eagerly reworked his writing for the broadest audiences possible. It is not for nothing that broadcasters such as the BBC return to Zola so often - most recently with The Paradise (2012). In older productions, particularly, sweeping panoramas disappear, to be replaced by the boxy interior shots of studio-produced pieces heavy with dialogue. But television fulfils Zola's intention to provide, in close-up, a dissection of the characters' entrapment as they struggle beneath the weight of their heredity, era and environment. The passage from book to television is also the passage from a single author to a collective one, in a process which challenges many of the simple binaries which have dominated and limited key debates in the history of adaptation. Different identities commission, fund, write, direct and produce programmes which are then shown and re-shown in different contexts, forms, times and media packages. This volume brings translation theory into dialogue with adaptation studies to open new debates. It does so in relation to an author of key import to adaptation studies. Zola and the myriad television adaptations of his work ask us to reconsider the boundaries of authorship, adaptation and the artistic artefact. Kate Griffiths is Professor of French and Translation Studies at Cardiff University.

More Books:

Zola and the Art of Television
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Kate Griffiths
Categories:
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-07-15 - Publisher:

Emile Zola (1840-1902) has become one of the most adapted authors of all time, but while much has been made of his adaptation into cinema and theatre, television has largely been overlooked. Yet television, with its serial structures and popular reach, is uniquely suited to the adaptation of a novelist
The History of French Literature on Film
Language: en
Pages: 328
Authors: Kate Griffiths, Andrew Watts
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-12-24 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

French novels, plays, poems and short stories, however temporally or culturally distant from us, continue to be incarnated and reincarnated on cinema screens across the world. From the silent films of Georges Méliès to the Hollywood production of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary directed by Sophie Barthes, The History of French
The Art of the Text
Language: en
Pages: 235
Authors: Kate Griffiths, Andrew Watts
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-09-15 - Publisher: University of Wales Press

The Art of the Text contributes to the fast-developing dialogue between textual studies and visual culture studies. It focuses on the processes through which writers think and readers respond visually and, in essays by researchers in literature, screen and visual studies, the volume explores the visuality of the literary and
The History of French Literature on Film
Language: en
Pages: 328
Authors: Kate Griffiths, Andrew Watts
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-12-24 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

French novels, plays, poems and short stories, however temporally or culturally distant from us, continue to be incarnated and reincarnated on cinema screens across the world. From the silent films of Georges Méliès to the Hollywood production of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary directed by Sophie Barthes, The History of French
Adapting Nineteenth-Century France
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Kate Griffiths, Andrew Watts
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-05-15 - Publisher: University of Wales Press

Adapting Nineteenth-Century France uses the output of six canonical novelists and their recreations in a variety of media to push for a re-conceptualisation of our approach to the study of adaptation. The works of Balzac, Hugo, Flaubert, Zola, Maupassant and Verne reveal themselves not as originals to be defended from